MOOT HOUSE PLAYERS

Forty-eighth season

MOOT HALL - THE STOW - HARLOW

FOUR TWENTIETH-CENTURY EUROPEAN PLAYS
AND TWO FOR THE CHILDREN

2001 - 2002

THE SHOWS:

 

November 1-2-3, 2001 at 8.00 PM

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED (1938)
by J B Priestley (1894 -1984)

Directed by Rosemary Caswell

This is a character comedy at its best, a perfectly simple idea: three couples - respectable pillars of smug middle class Edwardian society - are advised that their marriages are invalid. This revelation affects the six victims in quite different ways - from anger, embarrassment and truculence to sheer relief for the hen-pecked at the prospect of release. The company is presenting this theatrical treat for the third time. The last production was in 1972 with the same director and two of the present cast. If you missed it then, or have never seen it, take the earliest opportunity of booking and discover how all is resolved.


January 24-25-26, 2002 at 7.30 PM

Once upon a time ... HANSEL & GRETEL & THE GOLDEN GOOSE
The Brothers Grimm (1785-1863)
adapted for the stage by Bett Hewlett
Directed by Bett Hewlett

This will be Bett's fifth consecutive children's production and her third consecutive adaptation for the stage. Now it is the turn of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, the German folklorists, who collaborated in the collection of folk stories from various sources which first appeared in English in 1823. Hansel & Gretel, even without the Humperdinck score, we know; but the Golden Goose? Sounds like a touch of pantomime in the air? Come and see - and feel free to bring an adult or two as well .....


March 14, 15, 16, 2002 at 8.00 PM

CONFUSIONS (1974)
by Alan Ayckbourn (b 1939)

Directed by Jon McNamara

The players have now presented seven of Ayckbourn's plays, but in Confusions we have five interlinked short plays for the price of one. All are funny and one enters the realms of farce. The plays are set in familiar Ayckbourn territory with the familiar Ayckbourn characters. we recognise them, suffer with them, laugh at their foibles and at the end of the evening, we start to think. --- We have all met people like that. But at the back of our minds there is that sneaking feeling that we are the people like that. An evening of fun and perhaps a little reflection. you will be in good hands; Jon McNamara has directed the last three Ayckbourns for us and he knows the territory well.


May 16-17-18, 2002 at 8.00 pm -

TRANSLATIONS (1981)
by Brian Friel (b. 1929)

Directed by Jack and Yvonne Mitchley

There is a considerable school of young Irish dramatists who came to the fore during the last quarter of the twentieth century and Friel must be reckoned its leader. Any contemporary Irish writer must be concerned with the political situation in his country and Friel has never shied away from it, but he takes an observer's view and lets the audience make up its own mind. The play looks at the impossible linguistic situation in the Ireland of the 1830's and draws some parallels Ruth the problems of today. In the word of Polonius it is a "comical-tragical, tragical-comical play. a fascinating piece which commands our attention.


July 11 - 12 - 13. 2002 at 8:00 PM

THE HOUSE OF BERNARDA ALBA (1935)
by Frederico Garcia Lorca (1898 - 1936)

Directed by Tony Edwards

This is one of the greatest plays ever to come out of Spain, written by a dramatist who was tragically killed in the Spanish Civil War. As with when we are married, this will be the third production of this play by the company. The previous productions in 1968 and 1988 were remarkably well-received, perhaps because we have tried to remember that lorca wrote comedies as well as tragedies and recognised that the play's reputation for unrelieved gloom was quite undeserved. The Hose of Bernarda Alba was the third in a trilogy of tragedies written by Lorca. In this play he attempted to get away from the romanticism that had appeared in the earlier plays and aimed at the wider audience of "the Gods" as he put it. The "House" is the family of Bernarda Alba - herself, five daughters and her mother- and the tragedy is not of one person, bernarda, but of the three generations. Lorca described the play as "a drama about the women in the villages of Spain, intended as a photographic document". It is a powerful play, but the "photographic document" has its lighter as well as its darker moments.


DETAILS OF ALL OUR MAJOR PRODUCTIONS ARE CIRCULATED TO ALL THOSE WHO ARE ON OUR MAILING LIST

If you wish to be included on our mailing list, please write to or phone:

Yvonne Mitchley 162 Orchard Croft, Harlow, Essex CM20 3BH Tel: O1279 425959

Seat prices are 5.00

Concessions for OAPs, the unwaged and those in full-time education: 4.00 .

We shall continue our Uncles and Aunts scheme for particular productions in which regular patrons are invited to introduce new young audiences free of charge to certain plays. Particulars may be obtained from :

Box Office Manager. Inger Collins 10 Burton's Mill Sawbridgeworth, Herts CM21 9PL Tel: O1279 726047

Moot House Players gratefully acknowledge the direct financial assistance they receive from their parent body MARK HALL & NETTESWELL COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION and for the storage facilities provided by HARLOW ARTS COUNCIL.




LAST YEAR'S PROGRAMME